Change in circumstances

The amount of help you get depends partly on how much income and savings you have, as well as who lives with you. If your circumstances change you should tell us immediately.

Living with a partner

By 'partner' we mean:

  • Someone you're married to
  • A civil partner
  • Someone you live with as if you are married to them
  • Someone you live with as if you are civil partners

If you have a partner, you must claim as a couple. We count your partner's income and savings, as well as yours, when we work out your reduction. If one member of a couple is claiming from us, the other member can't claim the same reduction for the same period of time. Partners can choose who claims.

Adults (non-dependants) who live with you may affect your benefits

Someone over 18 who lives with you may affect how much Council Tax Reduction you get because they are expected to pay towards housing costs and Council Tax. Even if your non-dependent doesn't give you anything for housing costs, or you don't want to take anything, the law says that this will affect how much reduction you are eligible for. They can be:

  • Relatives
  • Friends
  • Children who have left school or college and who you no longer get Child Benefit for

How savings, investments and property affect your benefits

We need to know about any savings, investments or property owned by you and your partner (if you have one). We usually call them all 'capital'. Your Council Tax Reduction will probably be affected if you have any of these. This is not a full list and you must tell us on the Council Tax Reduction claim form about any capital you have. You will also have to give us evidence of your capital.

Capital includes:

  • Cash savings
  • Savings in banks, building societies or the Post Office
  • Money in current accounts
  • Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs)
  • Tax Exempt Special Savings Accounts (TESSAs)
  • Tessa only ISAs (TOISAs)
  • Premium bonds and income bonds
  • National Savings Certificates
  • Stocks, shares, unit trust holdings, Government securities and bonds
  • Lump sums such as redundancy payments, insurance payments and back payments of Social Security benefits
  • Tax refunds
  • Money invested in a business and business assets
  • Property, such as a house you own but don't live in
  • Land
  • Money held in trust
  • Money you have borrowed

If your circumstances change you should tell us immediately.

Contact the benefits team